A U.S. Army base has said its Twitter account was hacked after it posted a series of lewd remarks on the website about a naked woman and female pubic hair.

Fort Bragg, in North Carolina, deleted its Twitter account after the messages were posted on Wednesday afternoon.

‘This afternoon the Fort Bragg Twitter account was hacked and a string of inappropriate tweets were posted to the account,’ one of the Army units housed at Fort Bragg said. 

Fort Bragg, in North Carolina, deleted its Twitter account after a series of lewd messages were posted on Wednesday afternoon in response to pornographic content

Fort Bragg, in North Carolina, deleted its Twitter account after a series of lewd messages were posted on Wednesday afternoon in response to pornographic content

Fort Bragg, in North Carolina, deleted its Twitter account after a series of lewd messages were posted on Wednesday afternoon in response to pornographic content

‘When made aware, the Fort Bragg social media team deleted the tweets & temporarily moved the account offline,’ the tweet continued. ‘The matter is under investigation.’

The base is one of America’s largest, housing more than 50,000 military personnel.

The now-removed posts were posted in reply to lewd messages and a naked pictured from an ‘OnlyFans’ user’s account that features pornographic content.

The garrison’s account showed its approval in a reply to one photo, and appeared to chastise those who commented that they did not like female pubic hair in another.

As of Thursday, Fort Gragg’s official Twitter account, which uses the handle ‘FtBraggNC’, was still deactivated on the website. 

Despite the base’s best efforts to remove the offending Tweets, other Twitter users were quick to save screenshots of them and share them online.

The garrison's account showed its approval in a reply to one photo, and appeared to chastise those who commented that they did not like female pubic hair in another (pictured)

The garrison's account showed its approval in a reply to one photo, and appeared to chastise those who commented that they did not like female pubic hair in another (pictured)

The garrison’s account showed its approval in a reply to one photo, and appeared to chastise those who commented that they did not like female pubic hair in another (pictured)

Many said they doubted the base’s claim that the account had been hacked, suggesting that an admin had not realised they were logged in to Fort Bragg’s account when making the posts.

But in a tweet before deleting the account, Fort Bragg denied that it was one of their social media admins.

‘As many of you know, there were a string of explicit Tweets from out account this afternoon. This was not the work of our admins,’ the tweet read.

In a tweet before deleting its official twitter account (pictured) Fort Bragg denied that it was one of their social media admins that had made the posts

In a tweet before deleting its official twitter account (pictured) Fort Bragg denied that it was one of their social media admins that had made the posts

In a tweet before deleting its official twitter account (pictured) Fort Bragg denied that it was one of their social media admins that had made the posts

‘Our account was hacked,’ they insisted, adding ‘We apologize to our followers. We have secured our account and looking into the matter.’

Col. Joe Buccino, the XVIII Airborne Corps spokesman, said the base had ‘ruled out any malicious intent’ by its public affairs officials, but added they still did not have much information about how the incident occurred. 

‘These accounts get hacked. That is the danger of a digital presence,’ Buccino said. ‘We don’t know how the account was [hacked]. It’s possible someone was able to guess the password.’

Fort Bragg (pictured) is one of America's largest military bases, housing more than 50,000 military personnel. It is also the headquarters for the Army Special Operations Command, as well as the 82nd Airborne Division

Fort Bragg (pictured) is one of America's largest military bases, housing more than 50,000 military personnel. It is also the headquarters for the Army Special Operations Command, as well as the 82nd Airborne Division

Fort Bragg (pictured) is one of America’s largest military bases, housing more than 50,000 military personnel. It is also the headquarters for the Army Special Operations Command, as well as the 82nd Airborne Division

Buccino said that none of the other Fort Bragg twitter accounts were affected, and that no classified information was compromised, but noted that the password was likely not as secure as it could have been.

Fort Bragg is home to the Army Special Operations Command, as well as the 82nd Airborne Division. 

Classified information in the military is stored on a separate system of interconnected computer networks called SIPRNet, according to ArmyTimes

As of Thursday, Fort Bragg's official twitter account was still inactive on the website (pictured)

As of Thursday, Fort Bragg's official twitter account was still inactive on the website (pictured)

As of Thursday, Fort Bragg’s official twitter account was still inactive on the website (pictured)

The alleged hack would mark the most recent in a string of high-profile hacks on the social media website in recent months. 

An investigative report by New York Regulators said last week that the hackers who took over several high-profile accounts in July had gained entry to Twitter’s internal systems by posing as company IT officials making a support call, according to CNN.

Accounts belonging to Joe Biden, Elon Musk, Apple, Barack Obama, Bill Gates, Kanye West, Kim Karashian West, Warren Buffett, Jeff Bezos and Mike Bloomberg were all among those affected by the hacks.

Each account posted similar tweets requesting bitcoin donations via the verified profiles.

The garrison’s Twitter account would also not be alone in being targeted by an alleged Twitter hack involving explicit content.

In September, the Chinese Embassy in the United Kingdom called on Twitter to investigate after its ambassador’s official account appeared to ‘like’ a pornographic post – setting off an online storm of speculation over whether the account was hacked.