Nigeria to Regulate Crypto-Currency Trading to Protect Investors


a close up of a device: A bitcoin logo sits on a LL 1800W power unit supplying cryptocurrency mining machines at the SberBit mining \'hotel\' in Moscow, Russia, on Saturday, Dec. 9, 2017. Futures on the worlds most popular cryptocurrency surged as much as 26 percent in their debut session on Cboe Global Markets Inc.\'s exchange, triggering two temporary trading halts designed to calm the market.

© Photographer: Andrey Rudakov/Blo A bitcoin logo sits on a LL 1800W power unit supplying cryptocurrency mining machines at the SberBit mining \’hotel\’ in Moscow, Russia, on Saturday, Dec. 9, 2017. Futures on the worlds most popular cryptocurrency surged as much as 26 percent in their debut session on Cboe Global Markets Inc.\’s exchange, triggering two temporary trading halts designed to calm the market.

(Bloomberg) — Nigeria’s Securities and Exchange Commission said it will regulate trade in digital currencies to provide protection for investors and to ensure that transactions are transparent.

“The general objective of regulation is not to hinder technology or stifle innovation, but to create standards that encourage ethical practices,” the Abuja-based regulator said Monday in an emailed statement. The agency said it’s obliged to regulate “when the character of the investments qualifies as securities transactions.”


a close up of a device: A bitcoin logo sits on a LL 1800W power unit supplying cryptocurrency mining machines at the SberBit mining \'hotel\' in Moscow, Russia, on Saturday, Dec. 9, 2017. Futures on the worlds most popular cryptocurrency surged as much as 26 percent in their debut session on Cboe Global Markets Inc.\'s exchange, triggering two temporary trading halts designed to calm the market.

© Photographer: Andrey Rudakov/Blo A bitcoin logo sits on a LL 1800W power unit supplying cryptocurrency mining machines at the SberBit mining \’hotel\’ in Moscow, Russia, on Saturday, Dec. 9, 2017. Futures on the worlds most popular cryptocurrency surged as much as 26 percent in their debut session on Cboe Global Markets Inc.\’s exchange, triggering two temporary trading halts designed to calm the market.

The authorities in the West African nation had in the past declined to recognize digital currencies as legal tender, with Central Bank of Nigeria saying in 2018 that crypto-currencies including Bitcoin, Ripples, Monero, Litecoin, Dogecoin and Onecoin, weren’t regarded as money.

SEC, as the regulator is known, said it views them as exchangeable securities. “Issuers or sponsors of virtual digital assets shall be guided by the commission’s regulation,” it said in the statement.

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *